RHINOPLASTY FOLLOWING SEPTOPLASTY?

Question:
About a year ago I underwent a septoplasty to correct a severely deviated septum that resulted from a broken nose when I was younger. My surgeon removed what must of been sizeable bone spur that was obstructing the nasal passage which definitely helped with my breathing. Unfortunately, it did little to correct the aesthetic appearance of my nose. The septum is still very deviated midway up the nose so it has maintained its crooked appearance. This is due to the septum pushing out against the nostril while the other “droops”. Furthermore, my right nasal bone is caved in slightly due to the break adding to the appearance of crookedness/curve. When I consulted a plastic surgeon a bit later about the possibility of a septoplasty revision he said it would not be worth it considering a lot of cartilage was removed. This would make it hard to re-anchor/attach the septum and would also increase the risk of perforation. What can i do to fix this asymmetry? Is a rhinoplasty still possible? And what can be done about the crushed right nasal bone? I have considered fillers to even out the appearance of the curve and create symmetry. Though i’d want permanent results, Is this a better option? Thanks in advance!

Septoplasty

Dr. A’s Answer:
It is absolutely possible to do a rhinoplasty after having had a septoplasty. It is probably true that you have a higher risk of having a septal perforation occur but this risk is still very small in the hands of a qualified surgeon. Ideally you would have had your rhinoplasty and septoplasty done together at your first surgery, but we can’t go back in time and change that so there is no reason to fret over it now.

It is important that you find someone who really enjoys doing rhinoplasty, is skilled at both external and internal nasal surgery, and makes this a significant part of their practice. This won’t be an easy surgery and the surgeon needs to have the patience to stand there for whatever amount of time it takes to disassemble your nose and reassemble it as straight, strong, and functional as possible.

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